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Old 03-20-2017, 01:43 PM   #1 (permalink)
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Honey Nut Cheerios Box Is Changing For A Disturbing Reason

The Honey Nut Cheerios Box Is Changing For A Disturbing Reason
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Old 03-20-2017, 01:51 PM   #2 (permalink)
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Wasn't expecting that to have such an emotional impact on me... I'm still not particularly fond of their cereal, but I like the message.
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Old 03-20-2017, 04:39 PM   #3 (permalink)
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Bee populations are in decline, and Cheerios wants to help. So far, so good. But they are sending free packets of wildflower seeds to people all over the country—and some of the flowers included are invasive species that, in some areas, you should probably not plant.
Bee careful..
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Old 03-20-2017, 05:40 PM   #4 (permalink)
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Frankly, the loss of bees has been scaring me for some time now. I have no love for the little bitches when they sting, but they're a keystone species, arguably the most important for our survival right now.

I'm really glad to see big corporations taking this loss seriously.
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Old 03-20-2017, 05:44 PM   #5 (permalink)
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When I plant my wildflower seeds I normally get them locally so as not to have to do a lot of research to be sure it isn't something invasive (like kudzu).

I guess I was thinking most people would be intelligent enough to think to check things like that before planting. Then I remembered the Tangerine Taboo.
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Old 03-20-2017, 06:14 PM   #6 (permalink)
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When I was growing up, San Jose was mostly mustard fields and cherry orchards. We had bees, and lots of them. I learned very quickly that honeybees will leave you alone if you don't try to grab them. Yeah, I was that dumb kid who said, "OH NEAT! A FUZZY BEE!" and cupped it in my hands.

Now, we live in a concrete jungle, interspersed with wild mustard. We still have bees, just not as many. I don't even see them buzzing around the bottlebrush bushes orthe clover growing in the lawns.

The trend of beelessness has been going on steadily for years. We've only just noticed as a society. At least we're trying to do something about it this time, rather than allowing a species to die out, like so many others we could have saved.
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Old 03-20-2017, 06:40 PM   #7 (permalink)
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The blossoms of the mustard that grows in the Santa Clara Valley have an intense shade of yellow that I don't see on mustard in other places. It's really beautiful to see a field full of it in bright sunlight this time of year.

There are still some producing cherry orchards down there, too, and to see an orchard full of fruit late in the day with the sunlight shining directly on the fruit is absolutely spectacular. If you get the right angle the cherries look like illuminated Christmas ornaments. I used to love riding through there on CalTrain during cherry season.
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Old 03-20-2017, 07:54 PM   #8 (permalink)
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We have a few mustard fields in the Fremont area still. They're nothing like when I was growing up in the 70s. My parents bought a townhouse in South San Jose. The entire complex was built on about three acres of land. We were surrounded on three sides by mustard fields, and there was a golf course across the street.

It wasn't till the late 70s that more housing developments went up.
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Old 03-21-2017, 02:07 AM   #9 (permalink)
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Mustard fields and green hills. That might be all the reason I need for a weekend afternoon back roads trip

I haven't bought Cheerios recently, but I did get some Blue Diamond honey-cinnamon crackers last week which had most of the back of the box devoted to the honey bee situation.
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Old 03-21-2017, 11:16 AM   #10 (permalink)
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Have no fear! Other half is doing his beekeeping course and will be getting his own hive shortly!
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Old 03-21-2017, 11:46 AM   #11 (permalink)
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We've been seeing bumble bees around our azaleas this year, and its a very happy sight.
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Old 03-21-2017, 06:30 PM   #12 (permalink)
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If anyone hasn't thought to do so, you may want to consider posting the article to your FaceBook, Twitter, whatever. This is something that is too important to the human race's survival (in the short term as well as long term). Word needs to be gotten out.

I know there is a way to pollinate plants without needing bees but there is no way to automate the process (that I am aware) that would cover whole fields of crops that require pollination (like tomatoes).

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Old 03-21-2017, 07:00 PM   #13 (permalink)
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Other insects pollinate, and so do various birds, but none to the extent of the honeybee.

The only species that is nearly as prolific is the bumble bee, and those are also critically endangered.
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Old 03-21-2017, 08:21 PM   #14 (permalink)
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Other insects pollinate, and so do various birds, but none to the extent of the honeybee.

The only species that is nearly as prolific is the bumble bee, and those are also critically endangered.


Bottom line is... we need the bees because the other critters that do pollinate can't make up for the loss of the bees.

We need them. They don't need us (except for to keep them from becoming extinct).
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Old 03-21-2017, 11:38 PM   #15 (permalink)
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One thing the ag industry could do that would really help with the declining bee population, IMO: Stop spraying pesticides on the plants! In addition to really fouling up the air quality around here, I believe the pesticide residual, especially on flowering crops like orange trees, are largely responsible for killing off our bees.

We buy organic whenever possible for this reason, among others.
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Old 03-21-2017, 11:51 PM   #16 (permalink)
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Bottom line is... we need the bees because the other critters that do pollinate can't make up for the loss of the bees.

We need them. They don't need us (except for to keep them from becoming extinct).

Technically, all life needs all other life. Animals produce bodily waists and CO2 for the plants that the bees need for food. Plants need bees in order to germinate seeds.

Bees are integral to the ecosystem as a whole. This is why they're called a "keystone" species.

Literal definition: a species on which other species in an ecosystem largely depend, such that if it were removed the ecosystem would change drastically.

We might find a way to go on with out bees. To borrow a line from Ian Malcolm in Jurassic Park, "Life will find a way." It always does. But if bees did die out in our lifetimes, and this is certainly possible, we would have a pretty gnarly famine for quite a lot of the world.
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Old 03-22-2017, 11:57 AM   #17 (permalink)
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Technically, all life needs all other life. Animals produce bodily waists and CO2 for the plants that the bees need for food. Plants need bees in order to germinate seeds.

Bees are integral to the ecosystem as a whole. This is why they're called a "keystone" species.

Literal definition: a species on which other species in an ecosystem largely depend, such that if it were removed the ecosystem would change drastically.

We might find a way to go on with out bees. To borrow a line from Ian Malcolm in Jurassic Park, "Life will find a way." It always does. But if bees did die out in our lifetimes, and this is certainly possible, we would have a pretty gnarly famine for quite a lot of the world.


That's what I'm saying, just in fewer words.
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Old 03-22-2017, 04:36 PM   #18 (permalink)
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My grandfather, rest in peace, was a beekeeper for 60+ years, went in peace sitting among his hives a few days after a stroke. My dad took over since, got around 25 hives now in 3 locations though it's not his main job. I was only ever involved because I used a lot of his honey for mead brewing, but maybe one day i'll move back to the countryside and get involved myself.

In a past job - I used to import entire shiploads of pesticides for DuPont and Bayer. Not my choice, but they were good customers of our company and it's not like I could refuse at the time. Since then i've been donating to organisations involved in protecting the bees. Figure at least some of the money from that business gets well spent that way.
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Old 03-22-2017, 05:06 PM   #19 (permalink)
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My grandfather, rest in peace, was a beekeeper for 60+ years, went in peace sitting among his hives a few days after a stroke. My dad took over since, got around 25 hives now in 3 locations though it's not his main job. I was only ever involved because I used a lot of his honey for mead brewing, but maybe one day i'll move back to the countryside and get involved myself.

In a past job - I used to import entire shiploads of pesticides for DuPont and Bayer. Not my choice, but they were good customers of our company and it's not like I could refuse at the time. Since then i've been donating to organisations involved in protecting the bees. Figure at least some of the money from that business gets well spent that way.
I hope you at least find a place where you can keep bees since you don't have to live in the country to do so.

They can even be kept in big cities: 10 Urban Beekeeping Tips
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