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Old 02-22-2017, 12:52 PM   #51 (permalink)
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My parents had a house not far from the 280/101 interchange. I think they were just out of that flood zone area.

San Jose flooding shuts stretch of Highway 101; other road closures in city
Wow. I've seen some mild flooding in the past there, but nothing even close to that!
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Old 02-22-2017, 04:59 PM   #52 (permalink)
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And here's what's yet to come - the snow in Tahoe:

Photos show the insane amounts of snow piled up in Tahoe - SFGate



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"We usually see three or four atmospheric rivers in a season," said Scott McGuire, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service office in Reno. "We've already had 10. We've had so much snow to the point where it's getting hard to measure."
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"In 2017 alone, since January 1, we've had 460 inches," said Sam Kieckhefer, a spokesperson for Squaw Valley Alpine Meadows. "Our season average is 450 inches. We received more snow since the start of 2017 than our average season."
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Old 02-22-2017, 05:43 PM   #53 (permalink)
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That is what Oregon needs every year, a good snowcap.

No, not the Central American hummingbird with the purple plumage and white crown.

The amount of the white stuff that accumulates on the top of mountains.

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Old 02-22-2017, 09:23 PM   #54 (permalink)
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For the record, snowpack is sitting well over 20 feet thick. We will have some epic floods when that stuff melts. On the bright side, waterfalls in Yosemite will be spectacular.

The commute in San Jose was rough this morning, due to 101 being shut down in both directions. Having one of the busiest freeways in the area shut down put undo stress on just about every other road on the map. I'm glad I didn't have to go through that mess today.
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Old 02-22-2017, 10:24 PM   #55 (permalink)
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That is what Oregon needs every year, a good snowcap.

No, not the Central American hummingbird with the purple plumage and white crown.

The amount of the white stuff that accumulates on the top of mountains.

We have friends that moved (themselves) from California to Washington and we helped with the move. Three cars and a U-Haul bobtail. Somewhere between Bend and the Columbia, on US 97, there is (or used to be) a turnout that had pointers to the various snowcaps of the Cascades off to the west: Three Sisters, Mt. Jefferson, etc. There was a marker you stood on and tablets in the ground in line of sight with all the peaks so you knew what you were seeing. He had us stop there so we could take in the view (he was the Washingtonian and had driven that route many times).

They did the move in the summer; I think it was late June or early July. The peaks still had plenty of snow, of course: several are over 10,000 feet. I hope that place is still there, and just as simple and available as it was then.
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Old 02-23-2017, 08:31 AM   #56 (permalink)
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Those peaks don't have "snow". Those are glaciers. That white stuff is supposed to be year round.
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Old 02-23-2017, 02:57 PM   #57 (permalink)
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Those peaks don't have "snow". Those are glaciers. That white stuff is supposed to be year round.
Which peaks? California or Oregon? Or just the tallest ones in both states? *flips a couple of pages* Which page are you on? I'm lost.

Is it a coincidence that I'm watching eps of Lost that I didn't get to see?
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Old 02-23-2017, 07:01 PM   #58 (permalink)
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This is Coyote Hills Regional Park in Newark, CA.

That bit between the green grass and the reeds sticking up is the bike path. About a mile and a half of it is three feet under water. The parking lot at the other end of this (it's off to the right about 2.5 miles) is also under about three feet of water.

Ordinarily, this whole area is kind of a dried out salt marsh. All the low trails and the Chochenyo Native Village are now flooded. I can't imagine Native people living in this area. There's no evidence they did a lot of boating.

First World Problems: I come out here to play Pokemon Go, because it's a spawning ground for some rares. Nearly every pokestop is inaccessible. So are half the portapotties. This made from a rather uncomfortable walk today, since I had to go really bad and the portapotty at the entrance was under water, and so were most of the ones at the end of the trail. D'Oh!
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Old 02-23-2017, 07:03 PM   #59 (permalink)
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Which peaks? California or Oregon? Or just the tallest ones in both states? *flips a couple of pages* Which page are you on? I'm lost.

Is it a coincidence that I'm watching eps of Lost that I didn't get to see?
The Cascades are covered in glaciers. The southern end of the cascades are in Shasta County in Northern CA, and they reach all the way up into Washington. They get both snow and glacial ice.

One of the reasons the eruption at Mount St. Helens was such a disaster is because a lahar formed from a melted glacier that used to be at the top of the mountain.
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Old 02-23-2017, 08:03 PM   #60 (permalink)
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The Cascades are covered in glaciers. The southern end of the cascades are in Shasta County in Northern CA, and they reach all the way up into Washington. They get both snow and glacial ice.

One of the reasons the eruption at Mount St. Helens was such a disaster is because a lahar formed from a melted glacier that used to be at the top of the mountain.
Yep. Reason I asked is because Oregon has more than one mountain range. I've yet to see the coastal range have permanent snowcaps, much less glaciers. I've watched the snowcap on Mt Hood recede the last few years. It's been a worrisome sight.
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Old 02-23-2017, 11:14 PM   #61 (permalink)
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I like that the two posts above mention the glaciers; I'd just come here to point out that the highest of the Oregon Cascade peaks (including the ones I mentioned by name) all have glaciers at the high elevations so Sredni was exactly right. They are high enough that their peaks have what the link I'm going to drop call "perennial snow and ice formations", some of which are called glaciers. 'Snowcap' is not really accurate, but maybe it's not entirely inaccurate either.

I in fact did not know there were so many glaciers in the Oregon Cascades so I didn't speak up earlier; I wanted to check. I knew Mt. Shasta, one of the Cascade peaks that escaped into California (along with Mt. Lassen) has several glaciers close to and at the summit, but Shasta is more than 14,000 feet (4270 meters) high. I think Mt. Hood is the highest of the Oregon Cascades and it's a mere 11,000 feet and change. But yes, all of the Cascade's high peaks still contain glaciers ('still' because the whole range was probably glaciated a mere 10 or 12 thousand years ago).

Glaciers of Oregon | Glaciers of the American West
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Old 02-23-2017, 11:40 PM   #62 (permalink)
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This is Coyote Hills Regional Park in Newark, CA.
Zounds! I spent a LOT of time at Coyote Hills. I first found it when I had a sort of place-to-place drive and maintain job that had lots of stops in the East Bay and I needed a place to escape for lunch/exercise away from civilization. I returned to it several years later when a much different job moved to a building pretty close by there, and I realized I could use it as a lunch hideaway.

There's another reserve just north (you can walk from one to the other across the intervening freeway by using a walkway that is part of the roof of the tollbooth structure for the Dumbarton Bridge, IIRC). Both places border on the San Francisco Bay and have Bay access.

You can walk along the edge of the Bay and just find a place to sit. Hardly anyone goes far from the main trails, or the bridge. If you go a bit north or south you're sure to be alone. Sit in the sun, watching the birds. Across from you is the San Francisco Peninsula and you can see all the cities there including the original up at the north end. Behind you and to the left and right sit all the cities of the East Bay (actually you can see Oakland and I think Berkeley from the shore you're on). Millions of people, factories, roads. Making all the noise that civilization makes.

With a single exception you hear nothing of that world. The only sounds are the cries of the birds, the sounds of the wind, and the constant splashing of the Bay's wavelets on the rocks. Surrounded by millions of people—in direct view of millions of people!—and sitting in what amounts to complete isolation from all of it. It's a wonderful experience, and I enjoyed it every time for years.

The exception is the airliners. It's right under the descent path to SFO (assuming normal wind conditions) and while they're still pretty high when the fly over you they are low enough to be audible from the ground. Not intrusive, but audible.
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Old 02-24-2017, 12:08 AM   #63 (permalink)
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I have a dear friend who sold his house and moved to Washington, I think it was last year. Turns out he was right. The flooding is awful.

Watch: Dramatic drone footage shows impact of San Jose flooding
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Old 02-24-2017, 12:13 AM   #64 (permalink)
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...I think Mt. Hood is the highest of the Oregon Cascades and it's a mere 11,000 ....
Ahem....True for the Oregon Cascades, but the Cascades get even bigger....

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Ascending to 14,410 feet above sea level, Mount Rainier stands as an icon in the Washington landscape. An active volcano, Mount Rainier is the most glaciated peak in the contiguous U.S.A., spawning six major rivers.
https://www.nps.gov/mora/index.htm

And Mt. Adams is a touch over 12,000.

However, I have to say, for sheer beauty --- Oregon's mountains win.
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Old 02-24-2017, 12:23 AM   #65 (permalink)
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Ahem....True for the Oregon Cascades, but the Cascades get even bigger....



https://www.nps.gov/mora/index.htm

And Mt. Adams is a touch over 12,000.

However, I have to say, for sheer beauty --- Oregon's mountains win.
To complement the mountains' majesty is the majesty of the world's smallest official park. At less than 3 feet above street level is Mill Ends Park in Portland.

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Old 02-24-2017, 03:11 PM   #66 (permalink)
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Ahem....True for the Oregon Cascades, but the Cascades get even bigger....



https://www.nps.gov/mora/index.htm

And Mt. Adams is a touch over 12,000.

However, I have to say, for sheer beauty --- Oregon's mountains win.
Rainier's taller than Shasta, even. There is nothing else in the Cascades that compares with Mt. Shasta's visual impact, though. The first time I saw it (in my 30's, believe it or not!) I'm pretty sure I actually used the words "...dominates the landscape...". Trite as that is, it best describes the situation.

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Mount Shasta (Karuk: Úytaahkoo or "White Mountain") is a potentially active volcano at the southern end of the Cascade Range in Siskiyou County, California. At an elevation of 14,179 feet (4321.8 m), it is the second highest peak in the Cascades and the fifth highest in California. Mount Shasta has an estimated volume of 85 cubic miles (350 km3), which makes it the most voluminous stratovolcano in the Cascade Volcanic Arc.

Mount Shasta is connected to nearby Shastina, and they dominate the northern California landscape. It rises abruptly and stands nearly 10,000 ft (3,000 m) above the surrounding terrain. On a clear winter day, snowy Mount Shasta can be seen from the floor of the Central Valley 140 miles (230 km) to the south. The mountain has attracted the attention of poets, authors, and presidents.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Shasta

I've never seen it from quite that far away but then I seldom get up that way in Winter. Even in the light haze of Summer it's routinely visible for 80 to 90 miles south. There's a road junction to the east, at 136 & 299 near the little town of Adin. Coming up 136 to 299 is the standard distance sign with mileage to the nearest towns to the east & west on 299. A third entry says "Mt. Shasta" and has a mileage—85 or thereabouts. There's no road leading straight to Mt. Shasta from there: I'm pretty sure that's just line-of-sight distance because it's sitting right there almost in the center of your view. Yay CalTrans. :-)

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Old 02-24-2017, 06:55 PM   #67 (permalink)
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I like that the two posts above mention the glaciers; I'd just come here to point out that the highest of the Oregon Cascade peaks (including the ones I mentioned by name) all have glaciers at the high elevations so Sredni was exactly right. They are high enough that their peaks have what the link I'm going to drop call "perennial snow and ice formations", some of which are called glaciers. 'Snowcap' is not really accurate, but maybe it's not entirely inaccurate either.
What goes on, is above a certain altitude, it's too cold to melt the year's snowfall. So it accumulates year to year, packing down to ice under it's own weight. Ice is a pretty weak material, so a large enough mass on a slope will flow under its own weight. We call that a glacier. The altitude above which the snow doesn't all melt is known as the snow line. On Mt Rainier it was 6,000 ft. I'm not sure how it varies up and down the cascades range. Since Mt Ranier is 14,000 ft tall, it has multiple glaciers on all sides.

Glaciers drag loose rocks along with them as they move downhill. Rocks grinding on rocks wears away the bedrock. This carves characteristic U-shaped valleys down the mountain. Eventually it wears the whole mountain down down to the point glaciers don't form any more. This is basically the height of the rest of the Cascades range *except* for the active and recently active volcanoes. Those build themselves fast enough to stay tall. Mt Ranier is an active volcano that is only 500,000 years old, young by geological standards. Mount St. Helens is only 40,000 years old. It's already busy rebuilding itself after the last major eruption.




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Old 02-25-2017, 10:14 AM   #68 (permalink)
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Zounds! I spent a LOT of time at Coyote Hills. ...

There's another reserve just north (you can walk from one to the other across the intervening freeway by using a walkway that is part of the roof of the tollbooth structure for the Dumbarton Bridge, IIRC). Both places border on the San Francisco Bay and have Bay access.
That's Don Edwards, which encompasses both Newark and Palo Alto/Menlo Park across the bay. Don Edwards has escaped any major flooding, mainly because it's higher ground, but it's pretty swampy in spots.

If you want to be alone and in the sun, there are two benches on the Coyote Hills side of the park, closer to Don Edwards, that are up at the top of the hills, facing the water.

They are the most serene places you can be, even with hikers below you.
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Old 02-26-2017, 12:53 PM   #69 (permalink)
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This just *might* be a tad unsafe to cross now. This is in Big Sur. And that's highway 1.

This is also a reason 101 is closed. It's a bit farther up the road

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Old 02-26-2017, 12:57 PM   #70 (permalink)
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Old 02-26-2017, 02:35 PM   #71 (permalink)
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State Route 41, the major route into Yosemite Park, is also closed due to washout of the highway. CalTrans is working feverishly to rebuild the road to have it open by March 10th.

Highway 41 to Yosemite closed at Fish Camp | Fresno Bee
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Old 03-15-2017, 03:59 AM   #72 (permalink)
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Old 03-15-2017, 08:34 AM   #73 (permalink)
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Wow! That's some fast work.

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Old 03-15-2017, 01:45 PM   #74 (permalink)
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My understanding is, they had to quickly clear out the sediment fan that was blocking the river because the water backing up behind it was interfering with power generation at the dam's electrical plant.
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Old 03-19-2017, 06:06 PM   #75 (permalink)
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Spillway reopened on Friday!

In this first video, after showing and describing the so-called "grand re-opening", the videographer goes on to explain the current situation and near-term future plans as far as repairing/replacing the spillway goes.

The videos are HD and purty-ful, so fullscreen 'em.




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